As one might imagine, this kind of commission plan can lead some Hempworx affiliates to engage in unscrupulous behavior to make sales and earn greater rewards. If you’re on Facebook, you may have seen some of this bad behavior yourself. Examples of bad behavior range from aggressive, pushy sales tactics to making outright untrue statements. We have documented examples of affiliates telling people that Hempworx doesn’t contain THC so can’t lead to a positive drug test and that Hempworx can be legally shipped to Canada. Those claims are not true. There are also reports of Hempworx affiliates pushing people into enrolling in the auto-ship option. With auto-ship, products are automatically shipped out each month to the consumer – something that earns affiliates even greater rewards.
While Jenna’s “How I cured my celiac disease” story is inspiring and research into the therapeutic effects of CBD is promising, especially in the treatment of seizures and other neurological disorders, the FDA is clear: Marketing supplements as having the ability to treat, cure, alleviate the symptoms of, or prevent developing diseases is simply not permitted by law. Yet that has not stopped Jenna and distributors from claiming that HempWorx treats a number of diseases, including Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, AIDS and cancer, often as an alternative to traditional treatments. In fact, TINA.org has amassed a database of more than 100 inappropriate and illegal health claims. They include:
The heat is very much on CBD oil sellers these days as the FDA continues to crack down on companies selling “questionable” (to put it nicely) hemp-based products. In fact, since 2015 – when the FDA first issued warning letters to multiple CBD sellers – the industry has been forced to clean up its act, at least in terms of manufacturing operations and brand transparency.
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