Also, as with any other MLM program, typically the ones who jump on board first are often the ones who really make a lot of money with the company. Unfortunately, many of these MLM companies end up being shut down later and people who have made significant amounts of money end up losing all of it due to government intervention. After all, there’s a very thin line between an MLM opportunity and a pyramid scheme. Often, this line can be very difficult to discern and will go undetected for many years.
2. Is Hempworx a pyramid scheme? No. Pyramid schemes involve paying commissions to people to bring in new recruits. The new recruits typically have to pay an upfront fee that enriches those that are higher in the pyramid. In many cases, a product doesn’t even exist. The scheme continues until they can no longer get enough new recruits to fund the operation. Again, Hempworx has a real product that is being sold. They charge a small fee ($20) to become a Hempworx affiliate but the focus is on making real sales. So by all accounts, Hempworx is not a pyramid scheme.
This is hemp oil which contains a full range of phytocannabinoids, including nearly 160 percent CBD content.  This became a point of confusion when we first examined the label but we have concluded the product likely does have the professed CBD content.  CBD and phytocannabinoid is used interchangeably because most of the phytocannabinoid is CBD with the other cannabinoids not comprising half a milligram for every 10 mg of CBD.

While Jenna’s “How I cured my celiac disease” story is inspiring and research into the therapeutic effects of CBD is promising, especially in the treatment of seizures and other neurological disorders, the FDA is clear: Marketing supplements as having the ability to treat, cure, alleviate the symptoms of, or prevent developing diseases is simply not permitted by law. Yet that has not stopped Jenna and distributors from claiming that HempWorx treats a number of diseases, including Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, AIDS and cancer, often as an alternative to traditional treatments. In fact, TINA.org has amassed a database of more than 100 inappropriate and illegal health claims. They include:


No it isn’t. In Pyramid schemes you have to pay commissions to people for bringing in new recruits. Typically the new recruits have to pay an upfront fee. It supplements those higher in the pyramid. A product doesn’t even exist in many cases. Until they can no longer get enough new recruits to fund the operation the scheme continues. The company has a genuine product that is being sold. You will be charged a small fee of $20 to be an affiliate. However, the focus is on making real sales and is not a pyramid scheme.


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