First off they charge to be an affiliate, there are enough CBD companies out there that don’t. They lie to you when you’re not paid on time making it seem like your fault, tell you to wait until next payday and then don’t pay you again, they actually e pert you to wait yet another week to get paid for three weeks earlier. They treat you like you’re an idiot and then lie to your face and laugh. They get pleasure from abusing the affiliates, make money off the backs of the struggeling all the while pressuring to buy more, more, MORE! Why throw good money after bad? You shouldn’t have to but that is exactly what they tell you you have to do in order to get paid. Think about this, you’re expected to go into online groups with a bunch of other people selling the same products, how is that helping you make money? It’s not. What these groups are designed to do is indoctrinate you into thinking the way they want you to think. You are the donkey and ‘helping you be successful’ is how they dangle the carrot. Does anyone really believe Josh and Jenna (her maiden name is Kahan, pun intended) make $10,000 a day? There’s videos on the internet where she claims just that. You would think with a daily income like that, they’d own the house they live in but they don’t, it’s a rental for $3,000 per month. For individuals claiming to make $10,000 a day why are they renting a home for 1/3 of Jenna’s daily income? Surely they can afford something more luxurious. The truth be told, it’s all smoke and mirrors and eventually the dominos will start to fall. I predict trouble ahead. Josh and Jenna are the modern day version of a snake oil peddler.
Aqua, Sodium Acrylates Copolymer Lecithin, Glycerin, Allantoin, Sodium Hyaluronate, Stearic Acid, Cetyl Alcohol, Stearyl Alcohol, Glycol Distearate, Menthol, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-100 Stearate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Emu Oil, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut Oil), Squalene, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil (Hemp Seed Oil)< Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Boswellia Serrata Resin Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Gluconolactone, Sodium Benzoate, Calcium Gluconate
What is clear, though, is the DEA’s classification of all cannabis extracts as Schedule 1 controlled substances. Even as more states “legalize it,” all forms of cannabis are still illegal under federal law. And that’s a problem for HempWorx distributors who have to move product. As the DEA spokeswoman told the Port City Daily news site in North Carolina, where marijuana is illegal but decriminalized: “The plant, for human consumption, is illegal, bottom line. If you ship it — then that’s interstate commerce, that’s trafficking, and so that’s a problem.”
Barroso, 48, became interested in CBD after being introduced to it by a friend in Colorado. He had long taken painkillers for a crushing football injury he sustained when he was 23. When his real estate business collapsed during the financial crisis, he invested in a pain-management clinic. Barroso describes that decision as "the worst thing ever," as he soon became addicted to opiates. Then his friend suggested he try CBD gummies, which helped him stay clean.

Vape pens produce little smoke and are easy to transport and use—plus they can easily go undetected. But the concentrated oils used in vape pens of CBD might contain a solvent called propylene glycol. When burned at high temperatures, propylene glycol can degrade into formaldehyde, a chemical that can irritate the nose and eyes and could increase the risk of asthma and cancer. To avoid this problem, consider CBD vape pens that advertise “solvent-free oils.”
This is verifiable thanks to third-party lab reports. The reports are posted directly on the HempWorx website, showing you that they have nothing to hide. Every batch is tested by a third-party laboratory, which conducts a gas chromatography test, antimicrobial tests, potency tests, and provides certificates of analysis. You can see all of these on the website.
To date the FDA has only approved one drug containing CBD and that was only after it was shown to meet rigorous scientific standards. Last November, the FDA shipped warning letters to four CBD companies for making unproven health claims. Last summer, Josh Zwagil warned distributors to avoid using words like “cures,” “prevents,” and “treats” in the marketing of HempWorx products because regulators like the FDA are keeping close watch, the Canadian Broadcasting Company reported. Clearly, that message was not received by all distributors. (See more on the legal issue in the last section of this article.)
Hempworx boasts in this YouTube video that they pay huge commissions (up to 85% of revenue) to their affiliates. That means that up to 85% of the price that people pay is being paid in commissions to the selling affiliate and their “upline” network of other Hempworx affiliates. The video also promises the potential for affiliates to earn iPads, flatscreen TVs, luxury vacations, cruises, diamond watches, $100,000 cash bonuses and even new cars.

Much work still needs to be done with the general public, farmers and our elected officials about the nutritional, industrial, environmental and medicinal benefits of hemp. As laws change, research is conducted and commercialization begins, sharing information will be vital to ensure the hemp industry thrives. NHA is committed to advancing this awareness and knowledge.
In terms of price, Hempworx is actually a tad bit cheaper than the majority of the leading CBD oil brands in the U.S. As we went over in the Hempworx product reviews, their 500 mg (15 mL) oil sells for $69, which is just a hair less than our favorite brands (we won’t mention any names in particular for fear of turning this into a “brand pitch,” but you can check out this article if you want to know which brand specifically we’re talking about).
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