FDA and Legal Disclosure:  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. MyDailyChoice, Inc., developer of HempWorx LLC, assumes no responsibility for the improper use of and self-diagnosis and/or treatment using these products. Our products should not be confused with prescription medicine and they should not be used as a substitute for medically supervised therapy. If you suspect you suffer from clinical deficiencies, consult a licensed, qualified medical doctor. You must be at least 18 years old to visit our website and make product purchases. Please click here to review our full disclaimer page.  None of the information on our website is intended to be construed as medical advice or instruction.
On Dec. 20, President Donald Trump signed the 2018 Farm Bill, an annual piece of legislation that governs regulations and funding across the entire agriculture industry of the U.S. Naturally, such a bill has sweeping effects that have significant implications on both the U.S. economy and food production. This year, however, there is one measure that especially stands out: federal hemp legalization.
For one, I live in a state where marijuana is not yet legal, so I was forced to buy it off the street (from friends most of the time), and buying it like that, you never really know what you are getting. You don’t know if you are getting an Indica or Sativa, what strain of plant you are smoking (White Widow, Sour Diesel, etc…), and you still pay an arm and a leg for small bags of it. Not to mention constantly being in fear that I might be pulled over with it on me and end up going to jail for possessing a plant (Ridiculous)!
HempWorx did not come into the picture until May 2017, when it merged into My Daily Choice and became its flagship product, supplementing the line of “nutritional sprays” promoted for everything from weight loss (Trim 365) to cognitive function (simply, Brain). The idea for HempWorx came in the waiting room of a doctor’s office. “I was really sick,” Josh’s wife, Jenna Zwagil, said in a recent interview in which she recounted the visit. As the story goes, in 2014, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. She cut gluten out of her diet but wasn’t getting better. As she waited to be called in for her appointment, she started reading an article on her phone on “the power of cannabis” in treating autoimmune disorders like hers. When she finished the article, she said, she walked out of the office without seeing the doctor to immediately seek out cannabidiol or CBD. Josh and Jenna Zwagil’s “How We Met” story, posted on a shared Facebook account, picks it up from there:
One company that’s paying attention to JD Farms is Whole Foods Market Inc. According to one of its senior global grocery buyers, David Lafferty, “shoppers are seeking out hemp products more than ever, thanks to both product innovation and the increased promotion of hemp’s nutritional benefits by food brands.” JD Farms has teamed with Satur Farms—the Long Island-based supplier of gourmet greens and vegetables—on a baby greens mix of kale and hemp that will be available at Whole Foods throughout the Northeast by the end of July. The salad’s sharp leaves are vaguely reminiscent of pot and have a similar sharp, almost minty flavor. Co-owner Paulette Satur describes the flavor as “lemony,” and is optimistic about the project. “We decided it fits in well with kale in terms of texture and its being chockablock with health benefits. And we’re the first to offer baby hemp leaves in the U.S., which is exciting.” Of the slight, physical resemblance hemp shares with pot leaves, Satur jokes, “Maybe this is a good way to get older kids to eat their vegetables.”
For even more assurance about a product’s quality, Boyar recommends checking the COA to see whether it says that the lab meets “ISO 17025” standards. That suggests the lab adheres to high scientific standards. Also look to see whether a company uses testing methods validated by one of three respected national standard-setting organizations: the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists (AOAC), the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia (AHP), or the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP).    
Whether you like it or not, weed is a $1 billion industry. It's not just about smoking it. The flowers and seeds are used for organic body care, health foods, and other nutraceuticals. So there are companies such as Hempworx earning money by selling these hemp based products. You probably know this already and it's why you have searched through several Hempworx reviews.
Again, this business opportunity claims to be an affiliate model, but as you can see from the prices above, the fact that you must recruit others to your “team,” and the fact that you must buy a product from the company before you can ever earn any money from them, it’s easy to see that this is in fact an MLM business model rather than an affiliate one.
I did like the products at first. After 3 months the product seemed to stop working. There always seems to be shipping issues. Don't get me started on how annoying the representatives that sell this are or the company itself with their numerous emails sent on a daily basis. They seem to care more about getting people to sell their product then to use their product. I would not recommend.
A growing body of evidence suggests that hemp roots can remove toxins from soil and water better than practically any other plant. Hemp has been proven to absorb heavy metals from soil, including zinc, cadmium, lead and arsenic. Hemp has been used to detoxify the soil around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Hemp could help address climate change, since it absorbs four times more carbon dioxide than trees while growing in just a fraction of the time.
2. Is Hempworx a pyramid scheme? No. Pyramid schemes involve paying commissions to people to bring in new recruits. The new recruits typically have to pay an upfront fee that enriches those that are higher in the pyramid. In many cases, a product doesn’t even exist. The scheme continues until they can no longer get enough new recruits to fund the operation. Again, Hempworx has a real product that is being sold. They charge a small fee ($20) to become a Hempworx affiliate but the focus is on making real sales. So by all accounts, Hempworx is not a pyramid scheme.
Unlike hemp-derived CBD products, those made from marijuana must undergo testing—at least in states that permit medical and recreational use of marijuana. In some of those states, dispensary staff are supposed to have the COAs available and be willing to share them with you. If they aren’t, or the COA is not available, go to another dispensary or choose another product.

It is important that the CBD is actually dry during processing and added to hemp oil as a natural carrier. This process allows us to maintain the FDA and legal standard guidelines of Zero THC. Our competitors typically will use coconut oil, palm oil or a non-relative carrier for dried CBD. Do not be confused by the carrier of hemp oil. Our product is CBD Oil. Other competitors disregard the legal standard and you get unregulated, high amounts of THC in your product. With HempWorx you get the benefits of CBD without the downside of THC and remain compliant. Our CBD is grown in Kentucky and tested in an FDA approved facility.


Until recently, Hempworx had a page of “testimonials” on their corporate website. It’s since been removed. Likely because the FDA doesn’t look kindly on fake testimonials. Most people assume that testimonials are from satisfied customers who have no affiliation with Hempworx. But this was not the case. The “testimonials” on their website were all from high-ranking affiliates who sell Hempworx. So in reality, these are hardly impartial reviews.
Overall, based on my personal HempWorx CBD oil review I would probably recommend HempWorx for people who have been (or plan on) using CBD as a routine daily treatment. Their 750 CBD oil was pretty effective for may anxiety and panic attacks, and it definitely helped me get to sleep in the evenings where I was having more intense episodes than normal.
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